The Trustees of the

BALTIMORE COUNCIL ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Cordially Invite You to an Address by

 

Mr. Hendrik Meijer

Executive Chairman, Meijer Inc.

 

Monday, May 7, 2018

Reception: 5:15 p.m.      Address: 6:00 p.m.

WORLD TRADE CENTER BALTIMORE

Members: Free of Charge* – Guest of a Member: $10.00 – Non-Members: 25.00**

“Arthur Vandenberg: The Man in the Middle of the American Century”

The Trustees of the

BALTIMORE COUNCIL ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Cordially Invite You to an Address by

 

James Goldgeier, Ph.D.

Professor of International Relations

School of International Service, American University

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Reception: 5:15 p.m.      Address: 6:00 p.m.

WORLD TRADE CENTER BALTIMORE

Members: Free of Charge* – Guest of a Member: $10.00 – Non-Members: 25.00**

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"U.S.-Russia Relations:

Why Did They Get So Bad and What Can Be Done About It?"

United States disagreements and tensions with Russia are many, deep, dangerous and obvious: who should have political influence in Ukraine and Eastern Europe generally; Russia’s “military” intervention in Ukraine; Russia’s seizure of Crimea; U.S.-Russia rivalries in Syria with implications for Iran and the balance of power in the Middle East; the reach of NATO into the Baltic States and beyond; growing Russian ties with China; the angers of President Putin over loss of territory, prestige, and power; and Russian efforts to strike the weak point of our democracy by exacerbating factional divides. It is surely reasonable and necessary to ask “how did this get so bad?” It is equally reasonable to ask “what can be done about it?” It is a very long road to realizing an appropriately strong Russian economy and agreeing upon a place in regional and world affairs commensurate with Russia’s size, potential prosperity, and cultural and intellectual vitality. However, Russia, a great nuclear power now and a much richer nation in the future, must have an appropriate and agreed upon place and role in world affairs if the international order is to be stable. The path of the United States in any evolution in the relationship is demanding and surely critical.  

 

We have the good fortune to be able to benefit from the wisdom of Professor Goldgeier on this extraordinarily important subject.

 

He is a graduate of Harvard University and received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently professor of international relations at American University, and is a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was on the faculty of George Washington University and taught at Cornell. He has held fellowships at prestigious organizations including the German Marshall Fund, the Woodrow Wilson Center, the Library of Congress, and the Brookings Institution. He has held leadership positions in important professional organizations and been a leader in the effort to encourage scholarly works aimed at improving policy.

 

His first book was Leadership Style and Soviet Foreign Policy: Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Gorbachev. Later major publications have been Not Whether but When: The U.S. Decision to Enlarge NATO; Power and Purpose: U.S. Policy Toward Russia After the Cold War (with former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Professor Michael McFaul); and American Between the Wars: From 11-9 to 9-11 (co-authored).

 

It is an honor and pleasure to welcome Professor James Goldgeier to the Council.